By heating the full-bodied paint to 60-80 °C, it is possible to apply a thicker coat. Originally the paint was recirculated, but as this caused bodying up, the system was changed to direct heating on line. Hot spraying was also used with Airless and Electrostatic Airless to decrease bounce-back. Two pack materials usually had premix before tip systems using dual pumps.
Personal protective equipment (PPE) use: PPE must be used when handling spray paint materials, particularly PPE that offers protection to the skin. Some of the essential personal protective equipment are overalls with a hood, protective goggles for the eyes, half-mask respirators, and single use nitrile gloves. One of the most essential types of PPE is respiratory protective equipment (RPE). Nevertheless, basic RPE does not offer ample protection from the negative effects of isocyanates in human tissue. Paint products containing isocyanates must be handled while donning an air-fed RPE that has a 20 or higher APF (assigned protection factor). Air-fed respiratory protective equipment needs extra attention since they provide breathable air to the user. When in use, measures must be implemented to prevent contamination of the air supply since there is a risk of harmful substances entering the intake valve if it is not positioned outside of the spray area.
Sta-Kool 780 Siliconized Acrylic White Elastomeric Roof Coating Sta-Kool 780 Siliconized Acrylic White Elastomeric Roof Coating is a high quality flexible white acrylic roof coating. Product is enhanced with silicone for improved water resistance adhesion and life expectancy. Product resists cracking peeling while offering tremendous durability and long term life. The coating forms a durable protective barrier which ...  More + Product Details Close
Formerly known as MetoKote, The Crown Group and Electra Finish (EFI), PPG’s coatings services applies coatings to customers’ manufactured parts and assembled products. It operates on-site coatings services within several customer manufacturing locations, as well as at regional service centers, located throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Germany, Hungary and the Czech Republic. Customers ship parts to PPG service centers, where they are treated to enhance paint adhesion and painted with electrocoat, powder or liquid coatings technologies. Coated parts are then shipped to the customer’s next stage of assembly. PPG coats an average of more than 1.5 million parts per day.

Ignition barriers include six permissible materials. An ignition barrier can be 1/4-inch plywood or structural panels, 1 1/2-inch mineral fiber insulation, 1/4 inch hardboard, corrosion resistant steel at least .016 inches thick, 3/8-inch gypsum board, or 3/8- inch particle board. These sizes are the minimum; code officials will approve of thicker versions of any of these six materials as ignition barriers. Like thermal barriers, equivalent materials that have been shown to have equivalent fire resistance are acceptable. Additionally, an alternate assembly can be used if the assembly has been tested by a laboratory and meets certain criteria.
Spraying paint with compressed air can be traced back to its use on the Southern Pacific Railway in the early 1880s[1] In 1887 Joseph Binks, the maintenance supervisor at Chicago's Marshall Field's Wholesale Store developed a hand pumped cold-water paint spraying machine to apply whitewash to the subbasement walls of the store.[2][3] Francis Davis Millet, the decorations director for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, used Binks and his spray painting system to apply whitewash consisting of a mix of oil and white lead to the buildings at the Exposition, taking considerably less time than traditional brush painting and tuning it into what has been called the White City.[4][1][3] In 1949, Edward Seymour developed a type of spray painting, aerosol paint, that could be delivered via a compressed aerosol in a can. Spray Coating
Prodex eliminates the moisture (condensation) from forming on the metal sheeting. It does it by making the temperature of the metal sheeting on the building approximately the same on the inside as the outside. When the heat or cold from outside comes through the metal skin it hits the outside aluminum facing of Prodex and is reflected back upwards through the underside of the metal sheeting. This process keeps the metal sheeting temperature consistent on both sides. In addition, the inside layer of aluminum in Prodex reflects away the heat (heater) or cold (air-conditioning) from inside the building, from getting to the metal skin. This also helps in preventing condensation.  Insulation Spray Coating
Spraying paint with compressed air can be traced back to its use on the Southern Pacific Railway in the early 1880s[1] In 1887 Joseph Binks, the maintenance supervisor at Chicago's Marshall Field's Wholesale Store developed a hand pumped cold-water paint spraying machine to apply whitewash to the subbasement walls of the store.[2][3] Francis Davis Millet, the decorations director for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, used Binks and his spray painting system to apply whitewash consisting of a mix of oil and white lead to the buildings at the Exposition, taking considerably less time than traditional brush painting and tuning it into what has been called the White City.[4][1][3] In 1949, Edward Seymour developed a type of spray painting, aerosol paint, that could be delivered via a compressed aerosol in a can. Spray Coating
The atomization of molten materials produces a large amount of dust and fumes made up of very fine particles (ca. 80–95% of the particles by number <100 nm).[8] Proper extraction facilities are vital, not only for personal safety, but to minimize entrapment of re-frozen particles in the sprayed coatings. The use of respirators, fitted with suitable filters, is strongly recommended, where equipment cannot be isolated.[8] Certain materials offer specific known hazards:[6] Insulation Spray Coating
Henry 587 100% Acrylic Dura-Brite White Elastomeric Roof Henry 587 100% Acrylic Dura-Brite White Elastomeric Roof Coating is a premium high solids reflective roof coating. Its elongation peel strength and solar reflectance values offer weather protection high solar reflectivity and superior longevity when compared to economy grade reflective roof coatings. When cured it allows moisture vapor to vent ...  More + Product Details Close Spray Coating Services
I applied CMX on my wife's car and my car and had odd results. See pic. I ended up with little white beads that formed when I sprayed CMX on car, wiped it to a haze, but not completely off. After about 2 minutes I then began to wipe CMX until the haze was gone. However, oddly, after letting the product dry (but not yet wiping completely off) it began to form white little beads (possibly residual). What a pain as these beads landed in all the window crevices, etc. It's like when you have a bad wax that leaves dust. I had to use a can of compressed air to wipe the bead out of the crevices. I was thinking that allowing it to haze would allow CMX to bond to the paint better. After getting the beads cleaned up I tested again and spray CMX on, then wiped completely dry. No beads. Coating Services

We have a 1950's ranch in Atlanta and are interviewing foam contractors to spray open cell under the roof, with an "ankle wall" out towards the eaves to seal the attic. My wife and daughters are chemically sensitive, so I'm trying to figure out how to minimize the fumes coming into the house. Additionally, at least one contractor has offered (for > $900) to remove our existing rock wool & R-13 fibreglass from the attic floor to "increase cross-ventilation into the attic". Seems to me I can't both minimize fumes AND increase cross-ventilation. They also offered to spray a fire-retardant on for >$600. Would ventilation during installation help any or woud the retardant seal off the foam and help that way? Thanks...

Whether you work on frame-up restorations in your garage, or projects like refinishing wheels, interior upgrades or maintaining the appearance of your everyday ride, Dupli-Color wants to be there with you. We have a heritage of providing only the best in automotive products since 1938, when we first started selling touch-up paint. This marked the beginning of “innovative firsts” which continues today with the automotive aftermarket’s largest array of DIY paints, primers and coatings.
Thermal spraying need not be a dangerous process, if the equipment is treated with care, and correct spraying practices are followed. As with any industrial process, there are a number of hazards, of which the operator should be aware, and against which specific precautions should be taken. Ideally, equipment should be operated automatically, in enclosures specially designed to extract fumes, reduce noise levels, and prevent direct viewing of the spraying head. Such techniques will also produce coatings that are more consistent. There are occasions when the type of components being treated, or their low production levels, requires manual equipment operation. Under these conditions, a number of hazards, peculiar to thermal spraying, are experienced, in addition to those commonly encountered in production or processing industries.[6]
Blocking heat buildup is a complicated task. Heat comes in three forms: ultra-violet (UV), visible light, and infrared (IR). A quality ceramic coating will block all three, especially IR, which is responsible for roughly 57 percent of heat load on a building. “Some ceramic paints claim to block all heat caused by UV,” says Pritchett, “but UV only accounts for three percent of heat load on a building.” Spray Coating Services
Note: The practice of foam insulating the attic has raised eyebrows in the building industry because "standard" roofing techniques call for the attic to be ventilated; however, in a vented attic situation it will become approximately 130 degrees in the summer. There's no reason for an air-conditioning and vent-ductwork to have to work in that type of severe conditions. By applying Icynene right on the underside of the roof deck, the severe temperatures no longer exist in the attic. In short, the attic is now a "conditioned" space of the house that is just as comfortable as any other room in the home. This is called a "Compact Roof", which means you can frame right up against it. The one drawback of using expanded foam on the inside of the roof is that this will cause the temperature of the shingles to rise, but how much is not yet known. And how much damage a rise in temperatures could cause is debatable. Coating Services
I applied CMX on my wife's car and my car and had odd results. See pic. I ended up with little white beads that formed when I sprayed CMX on car, wiped it to a haze, but not completely off. After about 2 minutes I then began to wipe CMX until the haze was gone. However, oddly, after letting the product dry (but not yet wiping completely off) it began to form white little beads (possibly residual). What a pain as these beads landed in all the window crevices, etc. It's like when you have a bad wax that leaves dust. I had to use a can of compressed air to wipe the bead out of the crevices. I was thinking that allowing it to haze would allow CMX to bond to the paint better. After getting the beads cleaned up I tested again and spray CMX on, then wiped completely dry. No beads.
The Barrier product family is EPS foam under The Barrier product family is EPS foam under slab insulation and vapor retarder in a roll designed to insulate radiant heating projects from heat loss and retard moisture migration through concrete. The core of the product is made of flexible recyclable expanded polystyrene that provides excellent insulation characteristics that are ...  More + Product Details Close
Building code uses two different terms to describe barriers that protect insulation and prevent them from catching fire. The first is called a thermal barrier, which is a poorly chosen word. Typically, scientists and builders refer to insulation as a thermal barrier. Most people would think of a thermal barrier as something that keeps heat in. However, in building code, thermal barrier essentially refers to 1/2-inch drywall, though the definition can get more complicated than that.
For over a decade, Synavax™ has served as the preferred industrial thermal barrier insulation, energy saving, surface protection and asset protection coating, meeting the needs of multiple industries around the world, including pulp and paper manufacturing, food and beverage manufacturing, U.S. military, oil and gas, textile manufacturing and many others. Spray Coating
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