Mass-produced material is loaded on a conveyor belt where it is fed into one of these flatline machines. Flatline machines are designed to specifically paint material that is less than 4 inches (10 cm) thick and complex in shape, for example a kitchen cabinet door or drawer front. Spray guns are aligned above the material and the guns are in motion in order to hit all the grooves of the material. The guns can be moved in a cycle, circle, or can be moved back and forth in order to apply paint evenly across the material. Flatline systems are typically large and can paint doors, kitchen cabinets, and other plastic or wooden products. Insulation Spray Coating
In order to fulfill the requirements for an ignition barrier, most builders will choose to install a prescriptive ignition barrier such as mineral fiber insulation, install cellulose insulation, or install an approved alternate assembly of spray foam insulation coated with an intumescent coating. Recently, builders have begun using spray foam insulation that passes fire safety tests on their own, without any protective barriers or intumescent coatings.
Hydraulic and air-powered airless pumps have linear motors that require a hydraulic pump or an air compressor, which can be electric or gasoline powered, although an air compressor is usually diesel powered for mobile use or electric for fixed installations. Some airless units have the hydraulic pump and its motor, built onto the same chassis as the paint pump.
A rule of thumb puts two thirds of the coating on the substrate and one third in the air. True HVLP guns use 8–20 cfm (13.6–34 m3/h), and an industrial compressor with a minimum of 5 horsepower (3.7 kW) output is required. HVLP spray systems are used in the automotive, decorative, marine, architectural coating, furniture finishing, scenic painting, and cosmetic industries. Coating Services
In cold spraying, particles are accelerated to very high speeds by the carrier gas forced through a converging–diverging de Laval type nozzle. Upon impact, solid particles with sufficient kinetic energy deform plastically and bond mechanically to the substrate to form a coating. The critical velocity needed to form bonding depends on the material's properties, powder size and temperature. Metals, polymers, ceramics, composite materials and nanocrystalline powders can be deposited using cold spraying.[4] Soft metals such as Cu and Al are best suited for cold spraying, but coating of other materials (W, Ta, Ti, MCrAlY, WC–Co, etc.) by cold spraying has been reported.[1]

Synavax™ thermal insulation coatings help organizations improve energy efficiency. They are nano-engineered patented cutting-edge thermal paint coatings that provide next generation performance beyond older, non-patented ceramic insulation products.  Additionally, our products are eco-friendly and provide mold-resistant and anti-condensation properties without harmful biocides and other harsh chemicals, which is a significant plus for sustainably-minded companies. Insulation Spray Coating
Ever wonder why it's so hot and wet inside a metal building that has spray foam insulation, in the summer and so cold and wet in winter? The metal skin magnifies the heat of the summer and frigid temperatures of the winter. Metal is a very good conductor of heat and cold. In hot weather, metal framing and sheeting rapidly radiate the sun's heat into a building. In cold weather it rapidly releases the heat out of your building. When warm air comes in contact with the cool metal sheet, condensation occurs. 

For over a decade, Synavax™ has served as the preferred industrial thermal barrier insulation, energy saving, surface protection and asset protection coating, meeting the needs of multiple industries around the world, including pulp and paper manufacturing, food and beverage manufacturing, U.S. military, oil and gas, textile manufacturing and many others. Spray Coating
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