Are you tired of dealing with insulation jackets or insulation covers that don’t fit? Spray-on thermal insulating coatings by Synavax™ fit any shape of equipment and do not require any exterior jacketing. You can spray apply this technology easily while equipment is in-service and our concentrated insulation coatings will work diligently for 5-10 years or more without degrading.
One of the most common applications we handle is the production of custom pressure sensitive adhesive tapes. We also process specialty coatings with job-specific characteristics, such as anti-fog coatings, laminating tapes, fabric appliques, and more. Custom coating formulations are also available to meet the unique requirements of virtually any application. Insulation Spray Coating
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Our elastomeric rubber coatings for metal roofs provide unmatched flexibility and resistance against harsh weather conditions. From tin roof sealant to corrugated and rusty metal roof sealants, our products are specially formulated for a wide variety of metal roof types. Check out our full selection of rubber coatings for metal roofs below, in addition to application instructions for the best results.
The process typically operates at 39–120 °C to avoid thermal damage. It can induce non-thermally activated surface reactions, causing surface changes which cannot occur with molecular chemistries at atmospheric pressure. Plasma processing is done in a controlled environment inside a sealed chamber at a medium vacuum, around 13–65 Pa. The gas or mixture of gases is energized by an electrical field from DC to microwave frequencies, typically 1–500 W at 50 V. The treated components are usually electrically isolated. The volatile plasma by-products are evacuated from the chamber by the vacuum pump, and if necessary can be neutralized in an exhaust scrubber.
This is more common with closed cell foam, but it happens with open cell foam, too. Since closed cell foam has a higher R-value per inch, installers generally spray 2" in walls and 3" in rooflines to meet the energy code requirements of R-13 and R-19, respectively. (I'm not going to dive into the energy code here, but these numbers apply to many climate zones, the latter being allowed under the UA tradeoffs rule. See the Energy Nerd's blog on this topic if you want to argue.)

As discussed, many closed cell (and even some open cell) foam sprays do not need additional layers to serve as an ignition barrier. It is possible to use these spray foams, and leave them exposed in attics and crawl spaces. Additionally, you can use alternate assembly spray foams with intumescent coats and leave them exposed in an attic or crawl space without the use of an ignition barrier. In order for these methods to be accepted by code officials, the spray foammust be sprayed in the same exact manner they were in the assembly test in the laboratory.

I employed a company to insulate my three story house in 2011. They started Insulating it in August of 2011...They said it would be a 3-4 day job. They installed it in 0.5"-8" lifts all in the same cavity, this left burned insulation and voids. They removed what they told me was the bad insulation and in the process cut many electrical wires. They fixed this. They then reinstalled too thick again in some spots and removed again. They then installed it for a 3rd time. The areas that I thought were good are now separating from the structural members leaving voids. As of October 2012, 1 year and 2 months of dealing with the contractor I told them I want proof that what has been installed carries a warranty or I want my money back and I will fix the problems myself. They have yet to provide me with this warranty. I have spent many hours in the house looking at what is bad and they need to fix. I am frustrated, 14 months of additional rent due to their negligence. I would like to know how I can get proof that the product carries the manufacturers lifetime warranty, or has it been installed improperly throughout the entire house. Desperately awaiting your response. 
Most electric powered airless pumps have an electric motor connected through a gear train to the paint piston pump. Pressure is achieved by stopping and starting the motor via a pressure sensor (also called a transducer); in more advanced units, this is done by digital control in which the speed of the motor varies with the demand and the difference from the pressure set-point, resulting in a very good pressure control. Some direct drive piston pumps are driven by a gasoline engine with pressure control via an electric clutch. In electric diaphragm pumps, the motor drives a hydraulic piston pump that transmits the oil displaced by the piston, to move the diaphragm. Insulation Spray Coating

Charles: That photo is closed-cell SPF, and it's not sprayed perfectly uniformly. As long as it has the minimum thickness required (3" on a ceiling here in the Atlanta area), it should be fine. I've discussed some problems with SPF installations in the articles listed in the Related Articles section above. This photo is from about 10 years ago, though, and has no ignition barrier.  
Wire arc spray is a form of thermal spraying where two consumable metal wires are fed independently into the spray gun. These wires are then charged and an arc is generated between them. The heat from this arc melts the incoming wire, which is then entrained in an air jet from the gun. This entrained molten feedstock is then deposited onto a substrate with the help of compressed air. This process is commonly used for metallic, heavy coatings.[1] Spray Coating Services
You've got no argument from me there, Dennis. Getting a good installer if you're going with spray foam is crucial. Many builders or homeowners don't know how to find one, however, and that's where third party inspections come in. Also, even good installers have bad days, but if someone comes in behind them with a measuring probe and a Blower Door, there will be fewer sub-par foam jobs.   Spray Coating Services
To say spray foam insulation has become popular in green building over the past decade is like saying Peyton Manning is a good quarterback. It's an understatement. Although it's certainly not used in every green building project, it's become one of the most popular ways to build an air-tight house. In the early days, building codes hadn't caught up with how best to use this material, but that's changing. Change begets confusion, though, and the requirements for thermal and ignition barriers are one area where there's a lot of that.
once the foam is installed correctly, it is a inert plastic not much different than the foam cushions you sit on. there is not a health rick unless you have off ratio uncured foam that has not mixed properly. the foam is absolutely a health risk in its raw forms before it is mixed and cured. You should not be in the building without proper respirators and eye protection. The spray foam industry should be controlled and regulated by the same standards, testing and inspections that framing ,electrical and plumbing are. until that happens then you will have idiots with spray rigs ruining peoples homes and ruining the market for honest foam contractors that know how to price a job fairly and complete it correctly. Spray Coating Services

Car was washed with Carpro reset and wiped down with Griots garage paint prep to ensure a clean surface for first application of CMX. Week one CMX had a nice gloss with small tight beads after getting rained on (typical Si02 protection). Week two the beads were large and flat (low contact angle) so product was on it's way out. Week three the water was sheeting with no beading at all. That's complete failure in three weeks. Also I didn't like the white crystals that developed in the bottle. I'm concerned that if I used the product again that I'd mar my Audi's Mythos black paint. My car is parked outside driven only about 50 miles per week and is washed weekly with Megs gold class car wash. . Won't apply it again. Moving on....
Building code regulations typically call for the use of thermal barriers when spray polyurethane foam is installed. The code requires that the foam is separated from any living spaces by a layer of 1/2-inch drywall. As discussed earlier, any material that has been approved as being as equally fire resistant as the gypsum drywall can be substituted as a thermal barrier. Spray Coating
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