Good article, but it seems like you can chalk up almost all of those problems to the experience level of whomever is spraying the foam. Spray foam isn't an inherently bad product, but it's pretty easy to botch if the hired company is inexperienced. Fiberglass may be foolproof to install, but then again it has a terrible R-Value compared to a good spray foam. People just need to get referrals and do their homework whenever they research a spray foam contractor. Spray Coating

We have a 22 year old home located in southeastern georgia where the humidity is very high. In the past 2 weeks our floors have started buckling all over. We have a vented crawl space and the old insulation is drooping from moisture and the wood is wet. We are debating between the "encapulation" method or the spray foam method to repair this issue. Which would you recommend? Insulation Spray Coating

Fiberglass is also rated in terms of thickness. “Six inches of fiberglass insulation might get an R-19 rating,” says Pritchett, “but how many builders will cram that six inches of insulation into four inches of stud wall? That R-19 rating doesn’t account for compression of the product.” SuperTherm achieves an R-19 rating with one coat applied, and a rating of R-28.5 when the surface is coated on the exterior and interior.
This is more common with closed cell foam, but it happens with open cell foam, too. Since closed cell foam has a higher R-value per inch, installers generally spray 2" in walls and 3" in rooflines to meet the energy code requirements of R-13 and R-19, respectively. (I'm not going to dive into the energy code here, but these numbers apply to many climate zones, the latter being allowed under the UA tradeoffs rule. See the Energy Nerd's blog on this topic if you want to argue.) Coating Services
During the 1980s, a class of thermal spray processes called high velocity oxy-fuel spraying was developed. A mixture of gaseous or liquid fuel and oxygen is fed into a combustion chamber, where they are ignited and combusted continuously. The resultant hot gas at a pressure close to 1 MPa emanates through a converging–diverging nozzle and travels through a straight section. The fuels can be gases (hydrogen, methane, propane, propylene, acetylene, natural gas, etc.) or liquids (kerosene, etc.). The jet velocity at the exit of the barrel (>1000 m/s) exceeds the speed of sound. A powder feed stock is injected into the gas stream, which accelerates the powder up to 800 m/s. The stream of hot gas and powder is directed towards the surface to be coated. The powder partially melts in the stream, and deposits upon the substrate. The resulting coating has low porosity and high bond strength.[1] Insulation Spray Coating

What do you mean by "our AC units require fresh air ventilation"? Fresh air doesn't come from the attic. If there's an atmospheric combustion appliance in the attic, such as an 80 AFUE furnace, then you shouldn't be encapsulating the attic anyway. If that's the case, you don't want spray foam on the roofline at all. You can either change out the furnace to a sealed combustion unit or do your insulating and air-sealing at the flat-ceiling level.
Ignition barriers include six permissible materials. An ignition barrier can be 1/4-inch plywood or structural panels, 1 1/2-inch mineral fiber insulation, 1/4 inch hardboard, corrosion resistant steel at least .016 inches thick, 3/8-inch gypsum board, or 3/8- inch particle board. These sizes are the minimum; code officials will approve of thicker versions of any of these six materials as ignition barriers. Like thermal barriers, equivalent materials that have been shown to have equivalent fire resistance are acceptable. Additionally, an alternate assembly can be used if the assembly has been tested by a laboratory and meets certain criteria.

Yes, you're right that all of the problems mentioned above are related to the installer. I didn't try to hide that and even used the word 'installer' in two of the four headings. I can see how you'd think that the title is misleading, but in the end you can't separate spray foam insulation from its installation. Some people have the mistaken impression that if you get spray foam in your house, your home will outperform all others. My point here is that that's not true. Insulation Spray Coating

Heat Shield™ EPX-H2O is a complete thermal barrier insulation system for pipes, tanks, and other industrial equipment and can provide 100% insulation coverage of all odd-shaped configurations – no more expensive insulation jackets or insulated covers needed. This next generation heat insulating coating has you covered for all types of directives – energy savings, safe touch for employee safety, heat radiation reduction, and asset protection from chemicals and corrosion. Don’t leave uninsulated areas in your pipe and tank insulation system that will lead to heat and energy loss. Instead use an easy spray-on solution that can coat, protect, and insulate your entire heat process system, including valves, pipes, tanks, boilers, heat exchangers, and more. Synavax™ thermal insulating and protective coating is a technology you can trust to perform consistently for 10 years or more. Spray Coating

In plasma spraying process, the material to be deposited (feedstock) — typically as a powder, sometimes as a liquid,[2] suspension [3] or wire — is introduced into the plasma jet, emanating from a plasma torch. In the jet, where the temperature is on the order of 10,000 K, the material is melted and propelled towards a substrate. There, the molten droplets flatten, rapidly solidify and form a deposit. Commonly, the deposits remain adherent to the substrate as coatings; free-standing parts can also be produced by removing the substrate. There are a large number of technological parameters that influence the interaction of the particles with the plasma jet and the substrate and therefore the deposit properties. These parameters include feedstock type, plasma gas composition and flow rate, energy input, torch offset distance, substrate cooling, etc. Spray Coating Services
During the 1980s, a class of thermal spray processes called high velocity oxy-fuel spraying was developed. A mixture of gaseous or liquid fuel and oxygen is fed into a combustion chamber, where they are ignited and combusted continuously. The resultant hot gas at a pressure close to 1 MPa emanates through a converging–diverging nozzle and travels through a straight section. The fuels can be gases (hydrogen, methane, propane, propylene, acetylene, natural gas, etc.) or liquids (kerosene, etc.). The jet velocity at the exit of the barrel (>1000 m/s) exceeds the speed of sound. A powder feed stock is injected into the gas stream, which accelerates the powder up to 800 m/s. The stream of hot gas and powder is directed towards the surface to be coated. The powder partially melts in the stream, and deposits upon the substrate. The resulting coating has low porosity and high bond strength.[1] Spray Coating Services

What do you mean by "our AC units require fresh air ventilation"? Fresh air doesn't come from the attic. If there's an atmospheric combustion appliance in the attic, such as an 80 AFUE furnace, then you shouldn't be encapsulating the attic anyway. If that's the case, you don't want spray foam on the roofline at all. You can either change out the furnace to a sealed combustion unit or do your insulating and air-sealing at the flat-ceiling level. Spray Coating
In cold spraying, particles are accelerated to very high speeds by the carrier gas forced through a converging–diverging de Laval type nozzle. Upon impact, solid particles with sufficient kinetic energy deform plastically and bond mechanically to the substrate to form a coating. The critical velocity needed to form bonding depends on the material's properties, powder size and temperature. Metals, polymers, ceramics, composite materials and nanocrystalline powders can be deposited using cold spraying.[4] Soft metals such as Cu and Al are best suited for cold spraying, but coating of other materials (W, Ta, Ti, MCrAlY, WC–Co, etc.) by cold spraying has been reported.[1] Insulation Spray Coating
Our insulation and protective coatings are designed for the harshest outdoor and offshore environments, such as those experienced by our customer Sinopec on their offshore fuel oil storage tanks, black liquor tanks in pulp and paper mills like those of Weyerhaeuser, and even in the frigid cold of Alaska where our thermal barrier insulation coatings helped insulate steam and water pipes for the U.S. Army. Our customers choose Synavax™ industrial and building insulating coating solutions because of the superior combined energy savings, stay clean, and asset protection benefits.
Synavax™ thermal insulation coatings are the top choice for a wide variety of thermal insulating paint applications over equipment like pipes, pipelines, tanks, ovens, processing vessels, heat exchangers and more. Synavax™ patented industrial thermal insulation paint solves corrosion-under-insulation (CUI) by both insulating and preventing corrosion with a single product. Our thermal paint coatings are multipurpose spray or paint applied products that are simple to deploy.

Closed-cell (aka two-pound foam) is denser than open-cell at about 2 pounds per cubic foot. Its R-Value is between 6-6.5 per inch. As a result, this kind of foam is much more expensive than its counterpart. The reason closed-cell doesn't need a vapor retarder is because it already has one. It's permeance is 0.8 perm, which means it can handle cold climates without the use of an additional board or drywall. Closed-cell uses hydroflurocarbons (HFCs) as part of its makeup. However, this material has been known to have a high global warming effect. If you want a green insulation solution, this is not the material to use. A way to avoid this and still use closed-cell is by installing it alongside fiberglass batts. Coating Services


Legend Coatings and Insulation values the integrity of our work. We have extensive training when it comes to spray application. All of our applicators at Legend are trained and certified to industry standards. We do not stand alone when it comes to the building science behind our systems . We work hand in hand with Certified HVAC Contractors, Architects and Building Officials to combine our experience and expertise to find the best possible system to suite your needs and maximize your investment. Spray Coating
Combustion spraying guns use oxygen and fuel gases. The fuel gases are potentially explosive. In particular, acetylene may only be used under approved conditions. Oxygen, while not explosive, will sustain combustion, and many materials will spontaneously ignite, if excessive oxygen levels are present. Care must be taken to avoid leakage, and to isolate oxygen and fuel gas supplies, when not in use.[6]
I applied this product on a rolled asphalt flat patio roof. It was over 90 degrees and I could not touch the roofing at all on the first coat. I was laying on layers of cardboard to apply the silicone under the gutters and then rolled the first coat. The next day I brought all the cardboard to apply the coating under the gutters. I accidentally touched the roof and it was cool‼️  I threw the cardboard off the roof, laid down to do the gutters and roll the second coat. I was amazed how well this sealed and cooled the patio. I am going to apply this to my other patio and covered parking which are metal. I can’t wait to apply for sealing and adding cooling to these areas. Roof Coating Supply answered all my question and they ship promptly - I had my order in 3 days. Thank you. Spray Coating
×