Simple – we’ve seen experienced contractors work with the separate nitrogen tanks and spray foam rigs and have one heck of a time. These spray foam insulation kits are quick to learn and simple to use. They’re designed to be easy so you get results the very first time you spray. Thorough Instructions, 24/7 Product Support, and videos make it easy to install. Coating Services
Hydraulic or air powered airless provide a more uniform pressure control since the paint piston moves at a constant speed except when it changes direction. In most direct drive piston pumps, the piston is crankshaft driven in which the piston will be constantly changing speed. The linear motors of hydraulic or compressed air drive pumps, are more efficient in converting engine power to material power, than crankshaft driven units. All types of paint can be painted by using airless method.
Our elastomeric rubber coatings for metal roofs provide unmatched flexibility and resistance against harsh weather conditions. From tin roof sealant to corrugated and rusty metal roof sealants, our products are specially formulated for a wide variety of metal roof types. Check out our full selection of rubber coatings for metal roofs below, in addition to application instructions for the best results. Coating Services
We have a 22 year old home located in southeastern georgia where the humidity is very high. In the past 2 weeks our floors have started buckling all over. We have a vented crawl space and the old insulation is drooping from moisture and the wood is wet. We are debating between the "encapulation" method or the spray foam method to repair this issue. Which would you recommend?
Sta-Kool 780 Siliconized Acrylic White Elastomeric Roof Coating Sta-Kool 780 Siliconized Acrylic White Elastomeric Roof Coating is a high quality flexible white acrylic roof coating. Product is enhanced with silicone for improved water resistance adhesion and life expectancy. Product resists cracking peeling while offering tremendous durability and long term life. The coating forms a durable protective barrier which ...  More + Product Details Close
Spraying paint with compressed air can be traced back to its use on the Southern Pacific Railway in the early 1880s[1] In 1887 Joseph Binks, the maintenance supervisor at Chicago's Marshall Field's Wholesale Store developed a hand pumped cold-water paint spraying machine to apply whitewash to the subbasement walls of the store.[2][3] Francis Davis Millet, the decorations director for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, used Binks and his spray painting system to apply whitewash consisting of a mix of oil and white lead to the buildings at the Exposition, taking considerably less time than traditional brush painting and tuning it into what has been called the White City.[4][1][3] In 1949, Edward Seymour developed a type of spray painting, aerosol paint, that could be delivered via a compressed aerosol in a can. Spray Coating
This product creates a reflective silver finish, thus to help protect roof surfaces and lower roof surface temperature. It uses a low solvent formula, so it dries faster than other roof coatings.This roof coating can be applied by brush, roller or sprayer tip size .040-.061, 1000-1500 psi. We remind you that this product is not suitable for roof repairing, because it can not seal properly.
If you're plagued with quality problems caused by uneven application of coatings or waste of costly coatings due to over-application, take a close look at our products for precision coating. You will find a wide range of nozzles, standard and heated spray headers and automated spray systems to apply all types of coatings – including thick slurries, chocolate, viscous oils and more – uniformly with minimal waste. Spray Coating
We are turning our roof into an unvented roof assembly by raising the roof and blowing in SPF. We are planning to leave the existing vapor barrier down but remove the fiberglass batting and then adding 6" of SPF in all the cavities, to completely seal and insulate the house. Should we have any concerns about doing it "upside down" and not spraying the foam directly to the underside/sheathing of the roof?
We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock.

This technique is mostly used to produce coatings on structural materials. Such coatings provide protection against high temperatures (for example thermal barrier coatings for exhaust heat management), corrosion, erosion, wear; they can also change the appearance, electrical or tribological properties of the surface, replace worn material, etc. When sprayed on substrates of various shapes and removed, free-standing parts in the form of plates, tubes, shells, etc. can be produced. It can also be used for powder processing (spheroidization, homogenization, modification of chemistry, etc.). In this case, the substrate for deposition is absent and the particles solidify during flight or in a controlled environment (e.g., water). This technique with variation may also be used to create porous structures, suitable for bone ingrowth, as a coating for medical implants. A polymer dispersion aerosol can be injected into the plasma discharge in order to create a grafting of this polymer on to a substrate surface.[3] This application is mainly used to modify the surface chemistry of polymers. Spray Coating
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