I am building a house in Central Texas (Caldwell). Several builders are cautious about using foam insulation and/or a closed attic. I would like to use both. Here in Texas, heat and humidity (except for the past few years of drought) are a continuing problem. Which type of foam would be the best to use in our home, where should the vapor barrier be or should be use one at all, if we are using fans in the exterior walls to supply fresh air to the house, do we need a vented attic or will it cause more problems than it solve? I have printed out your article and the blogs to give to my contractors and architect, but I would really appreciate your comments on the products being used in my part of the US. 
With the increase in spray foaminsulation, many are wondering whether or not you should use a thermal or ignition barrier. Additionally, many are wondering if building codes require ignition or thermal barriers with spray foam insulation. The short answer is that you should use a thermal or ignition barrier, but the code may not necessarily require it. Building codes are often complicated, poorly written, poorly enforced, and up to interpretation by local code officials. This results in ambiguous requirements regarding spray foam insulation and fire protection. Spray Coating
Legend Coatings and Insulation values the integrity of our work. We have extensive training when it comes to spray application. All of our applicators at Legend are trained and certified to industry standards. We do not stand alone when it comes to the building science behind our systems . We work hand in hand with Certified HVAC Contractors, Architects and Building Officials to combine our experience and expertise to find the best possible system to suite your needs and maximize your investment. Spray Coating
We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock. Coating Services
Building code regulations typically call for the use of thermal barriers when spray polyurethane foam is installed. The code requires that the foam is separated from any living spaces by a layer of 1/2-inch drywall. As discussed earlier, any material that has been approved as being as equally fire resistant as the gypsum drywall can be substituted as a thermal barrier. Spray Coating
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