Yes, absolutely. If you put spray foam insulation in a building, it needs a thermal barrier. That's what separates it from the occupied spaces. If there's a fire in the building, a thermal barrier keeps the combustible spray foam from the flames to increase fire resistance. The International Residential Code (IRC) and Internation Building Code (IBC) both include requirements for thermal barriers (and ignition barriers, too; see below). Coating Services
Thermal spraying need not be a dangerous process, if the equipment is treated with care, and correct spraying practices are followed. As with any industrial process, there are a number of hazards, of which the operator should be aware, and against which specific precautions should be taken. Ideally, equipment should be operated automatically, in enclosures specially designed to extract fumes, reduce noise levels, and prevent direct viewing of the spraying head. Such techniques will also produce coatings that are more consistent. There are occasions when the type of components being treated, or their low production levels, requires manual equipment operation. Under these conditions, a number of hazards, peculiar to thermal spraying, are experienced, in addition to those commonly encountered in production or processing industries.[6]
Health monitoring: In order to avoid development of illnesses associated with exposure to isocyanates, health authorities recommend that people who use spray paint products that contain the substance provide a urine sample after a work shift at least once a year, with high frequencies in first few months on the job. A urine sample with ascertain levels of exposure, not the presence of disease associated with harmful chemicals. Spray Coating Services
Building code regulations typically call for the use of thermal barriers when spray polyurethane foam is installed. The code requires that the foam is separated from any living spaces by a layer of 1/2-inch drywall. As discussed earlier, any material that has been approved as being as equally fire resistant as the gypsum drywall can be substituted as a thermal barrier. Spray Coating
The standard prescriptive material that can be used as a thermal barrier is 1/2" gypsum board (a.k.a. drywall or sheetrock). Anything else has to be approved as an 'equivalent thermal barrier' by undergoing tests for temperature transmission and fire integrity. In some cases, however, you need only one test. According to the Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance (SPFA), "Under specific conditions, the temperature transmission test can be waived if approved by building code authorities on the basis of large-scale fire testing representing actual uses." (See their pdf document, Thermal and Ignition Barriers For The SPF Industry.) Coating Services
Whether or not an intumescent coating, or even a thermal or ignition barrier, is needed often depends on the type of spray foaminsulation that builders use. Many closed cell foam sprays are already sufficiently fire resistant and need no additional barriers. Ultimately, whether or not you need an ignition barrier or thermal barrier varies depending on location and materials. You should check with your local code official to ensure that your insulation work is up to code. Spray Coating
The deposits consist of a multitude of pancake-like 'splats' called lamellae, formed by flattening of the liquid droplets. As the feedstock powders typically have sizes from micrometers to above 100 micrometers, the lamellae have thickness in the micrometer range and lateral dimension from several to hundreds of micrometers. Between these lamellae, there are small voids, such as pores, cracks and regions of incomplete bonding. As a result of this unique structure, the deposits can have properties significantly different from bulk materials. These are generally mechanical properties, such as lower strength and modulus, higher strain tolerance, and lower thermal and electrical conductivity. Also, due to the rapid solidification, metastable phases can be present in the deposits. Insulation Spray Coating

There is a significant price difference when it comes to using foam insulation to insulate a new versus older home. Spraying insulation inside a newly constructed home is easier because the installation company can ensure the insulation will work effectively and design it for optimum defense against sound, heat transfer and utility costs. Installing spray foam in older homes that contain existing insulation can cost additional time and money -- it is not usually recommended as compared to weatherization or an energy aduit. Insulation Spray Coating

A rule of thumb puts two thirds of the coating on the substrate and one third in the air. True HVLP guns use 8–20 cfm (13.6–34 m3/h), and an industrial compressor with a minimum of 5 horsepower (3.7 kW) output is required. HVLP spray systems are used in the automotive, decorative, marine, architectural coating, furniture finishing, scenic painting, and cosmetic industries. Spray Coating
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