Plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) is another form of wire arc spray which deposits a coating on the internal surface of a cylinder, or on the external surface of a part of any geometry. It is predominantly known for its use in coating the cylinder bores of an engine, enabling the use of Aluminum engine blocks without the need for heavy cast iron sleeves. A single conductive wire is used as "feedstock" for the system. A supersonic plasma jet melts the wire, atomizes it and propels it onto the substrate. The plasma jet is formed by a transferred arc between a non-consumable cathode and the type of a wire. After atomization, forced air transports the stream of molten droplets onto the bore wall. The particles flatten when they impinge on the surface of the substrate, due to the high kinetic energy. The particles rapidly solidify upon contact. The stacked particles make up a high wear resistant coating. The PTWA thermal spray process utilizes a single wire as the feedstock material. All conductive wires up to and including 0.0625" (1.6mm) can be used as feedstock material, including "cored" wires. PTWA can be used to apply a coating to the wear surface of engine or transmission components to replace a bushing or bearing. For example, using PTWA to coat the bearing surface of a connecting rod offers a number of benefits including reductions in weight, cost, friction potential, and stress in the connecting rod. Spray Coating


In recent years, there has been a significant rise in the use of spray foam insulation in construction. Spray foam insulation varies from traditional insulation, such as fiberglass, in many respects. Fiberglass insulation is typically much cheaper than spray foam insulation; however, it is also less effective at insulating your home. Additionally, spray foaminsulation requires professional installation. Though spray foam insulation is on the rise, fiberglass is still the most common form of home insulation used today. Insulation Spray Coating

Legend Coatings & Insulation, LLC has set the foundation for all insulating and coating applications. With over 12 years experience in the field we have established the dynamics uniquely behind each of our systems. Our dual proportional coatings rig allows us mobilization with the capacity to be self sufficient and finishing your project on time and on budget. Spray Coating

At Praxair Surface Technologies, it’s our goal to help you get more protection, more customization and more performance from your parts. To do that, we work with you to select or develop coatings based on your operating environment and production requirements. Then we combine advanced preparation services, the right application technology and post-coating operations to create optimal coating performance for any component. Coating Services
During the 1980s, a class of thermal spray processes called high velocity oxy-fuel spraying was developed. A mixture of gaseous or liquid fuel and oxygen is fed into a combustion chamber, where they are ignited and combusted continuously. The resultant hot gas at a pressure close to 1 MPa emanates through a converging–diverging nozzle and travels through a straight section. The fuels can be gases (hydrogen, methane, propane, propylene, acetylene, natural gas, etc.) or liquids (kerosene, etc.). The jet velocity at the exit of the barrel (>1000 m/s) exceeds the speed of sound. A powder feed stock is injected into the gas stream, which accelerates the powder up to 800 m/s. The stream of hot gas and powder is directed towards the surface to be coated. The powder partially melts in the stream, and deposits upon the substrate. The resulting coating has low porosity and high bond strength.[1] Spray Coating Services
For over a decade, Synavax™ has served as the preferred industrial thermal barrier insulation, energy saving, surface protection and asset protection coating, meeting the needs of multiple industries around the world, including pulp and paper manufacturing, food and beverage manufacturing, U.S. military, oil and gas, textile manufacturing and many others. Spray Coating
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