Henry 587 100% Acrylic Dura-Brite White Elastomeric Roof Henry 587 100% Acrylic Dura-Brite White Elastomeric Roof Coating is a premium high solids reflective roof coating. Its elongation peel strength and solar reflectance values offer weather protection high solar reflectivity and superior longevity when compared to economy grade reflective roof coatings. When cured it allows moisture vapor to vent ...  More + Product Details Close Spray Coating Services
I employed a company to insulate my three story house in 2011. They started Insulating it in August of 2011...They said it would be a 3-4 day job. They installed it in 0.5"-8" lifts all in the same cavity, this left burned insulation and voids. They removed what they told me was the bad insulation and in the process cut many electrical wires. They fixed this. They then reinstalled too thick again in some spots and removed again. They then installed it for a 3rd time. The areas that I thought were good are now separating from the structural members leaving voids. As of October 2012, 1 year and 2 months of dealing with the contractor I told them I want proof that what has been installed carries a warranty or I want my money back and I will fix the problems myself. They have yet to provide me with this warranty. I have spent many hours in the house looking at what is bad and they need to fix. I am frustrated, 14 months of additional rent due to their negligence. I would like to know how I can get proof that the product carries the manufacturers lifetime warranty, or has it been installed improperly throughout the entire house. Desperately awaiting your response.  Spray Coating Services
One of the most common applications we handle is the production of custom pressure sensitive adhesive tapes. We also process specialty coatings with job-specific characteristics, such as anti-fog coatings, laminating tapes, fabric appliques, and more. Custom coating formulations are also available to meet the unique requirements of virtually any application. Insulation Spray Coating
You want to know when the job has been done well and when it didn't go as expected. You take accountability for your actions and understand that in business, results matter more than intentions. As empowered decision makers, PPG Coatings Services team members take pride in their ability to help customers overcome their toughest challenges, while sharing in the rewards and satisfaction that come with a job well done.
The problem was that the installer was doing his first spray foam job ever, and the thickness of the insulation varied from zero (visible roof deck) to about 9". Unfortunately, good average thickness doesn't cut it. The coverage needs to be uniform because a lot of heat will go through the under-insulated areas. (See my article on flat or lumpy insulation performance.) Insulation Spray Coating
The video below is from a house near Charleston, South Carolina that I visited recently, and you'll see that the homeowner in this case didn't get his money's worth. I knew immediately when I walked into the attic that something was wrong because it was hot up there. In a properly insulated spray foam attic, the temperature won't be much higher than the house temperature. 

We are turning our roof into an unvented roof assembly by raising the roof and blowing in SPF. We are planning to leave the existing vapor barrier down but remove the fiberglass batting and then adding 6" of SPF in all the cavities, to completely seal and insulate the house. Should we have any concerns about doing it "upside down" and not spraying the foam directly to the underside/sheathing of the roof? Insulation Spray Coating
Steve: If your spray foam installer leaves the vents open, he will be committing the 2nd of the 4 problems I described above. You will most likely have comfort and efficiency problems. You may well have condensation problems. You will be spending a lot of money on a product that likely won't perform as it should. Don't let him leave the vents open. If the installer you've chosen doesn't understand this, you may want to choose someone else.  Spray Coating
I applied CMX on my wife's car and my car and had odd results. See pic. I ended up with little white beads that formed when I sprayed CMX on car, wiped it to a haze, but not completely off. After about 2 minutes I then began to wipe CMX until the haze was gone. However, oddly, after letting the product dry (but not yet wiping completely off) it began to form white little beads (possibly residual). What a pain as these beads landed in all the window crevices, etc. It's like when you have a bad wax that leaves dust. I had to use a can of compressed air to wipe the bead out of the crevices. I was thinking that allowing it to haze would allow CMX to bond to the paint better. After getting the beads cleaned up I tested again and spray CMX on, then wiped completely dry. No beads.
Spraying paint with compressed air can be traced back to its use on the Southern Pacific Railway in the early 1880s[1] In 1887 Joseph Binks, the maintenance supervisor at Chicago's Marshall Field's Wholesale Store developed a hand pumped cold-water paint spraying machine to apply whitewash to the subbasement walls of the store.[2][3] Francis Davis Millet, the decorations director for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, used Binks and his spray painting system to apply whitewash consisting of a mix of oil and white lead to the buildings at the Exposition, taking considerably less time than traditional brush painting and tuning it into what has been called the White City.[4][1][3] In 1949, Edward Seymour developed a type of spray painting, aerosol paint, that could be delivered via a compressed aerosol in a can. Spray Coating

During the 1980s, a class of thermal spray processes called high velocity oxy-fuel spraying was developed. A mixture of gaseous or liquid fuel and oxygen is fed into a combustion chamber, where they are ignited and combusted continuously. The resultant hot gas at a pressure close to 1 MPa emanates through a converging–diverging nozzle and travels through a straight section. The fuels can be gases (hydrogen, methane, propane, propylene, acetylene, natural gas, etc.) or liquids (kerosene, etc.). The jet velocity at the exit of the barrel (>1000 m/s) exceeds the speed of sound. A powder feed stock is injected into the gas stream, which accelerates the powder up to 800 m/s. The stream of hot gas and powder is directed towards the surface to be coated. The powder partially melts in the stream, and deposits upon the substrate. The resulting coating has low porosity and high bond strength.[1] Insulation Spray Coating
What do you mean by "our AC units require fresh air ventilation"? Fresh air doesn't come from the attic. If there's an atmospheric combustion appliance in the attic, such as an 80 AFUE furnace, then you shouldn't be encapsulating the attic anyway. If that's the case, you don't want spray foam on the roofline at all. You can either change out the furnace to a sealed combustion unit or do your insulating and air-sealing at the flat-ceiling level. Insulation Spray Coating
The video below is from a house near Charleston, South Carolina that I visited recently, and you'll see that the homeowner in this case didn't get his money's worth. I knew immediately when I walked into the attic that something was wrong because it was hot up there. In a properly insulated spray foam attic, the temperature won't be much higher than the house temperature. 
I've seen this only once, and it was with closed cell foam, but I've heard of it happening with open cell foam, too. I don't know the details, but I've heard it could result from a bad batch of chemicals, improper mixing, or too high a temperature. Whatever the cause, it's not a good thing. The photo below shows how the spray foam pulled away from the studs. A little bit of uninsulated area like that adds up to a lot of heat loss/gain when the whole house has that problem, as it did here. Coating Services

Building code regulations typically call for the use of thermal barriers when spray polyurethane foam is installed. The code requires that the foam is separated from any living spaces by a layer of 1/2-inch drywall. As discussed earlier, any material that has been approved as being as equally fire resistant as the gypsum drywall can be substituted as a thermal barrier. Spray Coating
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