Our insulation and protective coatings are designed for the harshest outdoor and offshore environments, such as those experienced by our customer Sinopec on their offshore fuel oil storage tanks, black liquor tanks in pulp and paper mills like those of Weyerhaeuser, and even in the frigid cold of Alaska where our thermal barrier insulation coatings helped insulate steam and water pipes for the U.S. Army. Our customers choose Synavax™ industrial and building insulating coating solutions because of the superior combined energy savings, stay clean, and asset protection benefits. Spray Coating Services
Consumers should be careful to distinguish between purely reflective coatings and true insulating coatings. Reflective coatings only perform when clean and will not block all forms of heat, but a coating with insulative and reflective qualities will block more than one form of heat. “SuperTherm uses four ceramic compounds to block short-wave radiation, IR, and to block the conductivity of heat through the surface,” claims Pritchett. “It’s not just a reflective coating.” Insulation Spray Coating
For over a decade, Synavax™ has served as the preferred industrial thermal barrier insulation, energy saving, surface protection and asset protection coating, meeting the needs of multiple industries around the world, including pulp and paper manufacturing, food and beverage manufacturing, U.S. military, oil and gas, textile manufacturing and many others.

Spraying paint with compressed air can be traced back to its use on the Southern Pacific Railway in the early 1880s[1] In 1887 Joseph Binks, the maintenance supervisor at Chicago's Marshall Field's Wholesale Store developed a hand pumped cold-water paint spraying machine to apply whitewash to the subbasement walls of the store.[2][3] Francis Davis Millet, the decorations director for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, used Binks and his spray painting system to apply whitewash consisting of a mix of oil and white lead to the buildings at the Exposition, taking considerably less time than traditional brush painting and tuning it into what has been called the White City.[4][1][3] In 1949, Edward Seymour developed a type of spray painting, aerosol paint, that could be delivered via a compressed aerosol in a can. Spray Coating
In recent years, there has been a significant rise in the use of spray foam insulation in construction. Spray foam insulation varies from traditional insulation, such as fiberglass, in many respects. Fiberglass insulation is typically much cheaper than spray foam insulation; however, it is also less effective at insulating your home. Additionally, spray foaminsulation requires professional installation. Though spray foam insulation is on the rise, fiberglass is still the most common form of home insulation used today. Insulation Spray Coating
Spraying paint with compressed air can be traced back to its use on the Southern Pacific Railway in the early 1880s[1] In 1887 Joseph Binks, the maintenance supervisor at Chicago's Marshall Field's Wholesale Store developed a hand pumped cold-water paint spraying machine to apply whitewash to the subbasement walls of the store.[2][3] Francis Davis Millet, the decorations director for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, used Binks and his spray painting system to apply whitewash consisting of a mix of oil and white lead to the buildings at the Exposition, taking considerably less time than traditional brush painting and tuning it into what has been called the White City.[4][1][3] In 1949, Edward Seymour developed a type of spray painting, aerosol paint, that could be delivered via a compressed aerosol in a can. Insulation Spray Coating

Synavax™ thermal insulation coatings are the top choice for a wide variety of thermal insulating paint applications over equipment like pipes, pipelines, tanks, ovens, processing vessels, heat exchangers and more. Synavax™ patented industrial thermal insulation paint solves corrosion-under-insulation (CUI) by both insulating and preventing corrosion with a single product. Our thermal paint coatings are multipurpose spray or paint applied products that are simple to deploy.
I have been looking to have closed cell insulation added through out my attic space. I cant seam to find a installed that wants to install no more than 2 inches, and thats not near my R-valve for South Carolina (Lake Greenwood)please send any advice that will help me to see what installer will perform the correct job. This is a expense that i can only afford to do once. Sandi
The drawback to spray foam insulation is it's been known to cause certain health issues such irritation of the eye and the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Direct contact can cause inflammation to the skin, and some individuals have been known to break out in a rash on the arms, chest and neck area. Spray foam insulation has also been linked to a few cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This condition can cause: Spray Coating Services

The long answer is more complicated. There are instances where ignition and thermal barriers are required, and others where they are not. It is all dependent on the location of the insulation. Additionally, the materials that satisfy the requirements of ignition and thermal barriers vary. In some circumstances, such as the use of an intumescent coating, an ignition or thermal barrier may not be necessary. It is important to check with your local code inspector to make sure that your use of spray foaminsulation and ignition barriers is correct.
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As this example illustrates, it's important to seal the envelope completely. One of spray foam's biggest selling points is its air-sealing ability, but it can't seal places where it's not sprayed. One of the nice things about using spray foam in new construction is that you can do a Blower Door test before the drywall goes in. Even better, you can test for leaks with a fog machine. Coating Services

Open-cell is also known as half-pound foam. It has an R-Value of 3.5-3.6 per inch, and its density is bout 0.5 pounds per cubic food. Low-density foams like these are made partially from raw biological materials Carbon dioxide or water is also used in the makeup. Open-cell uses far less material than closed-cell, but its R-Value is lower. Also, open cell requires a vapor retarder (like gypsum wallboard) and is riskier when used for roof sheathing. It's not highly recommended that you use open-cell insulation if you live in a cold climate unless you have that extra barrier. You should also compare how much money you spend versus how effective the open-cell insulation is wherever it's installed.
Prodex eliminates the moisture (condensation) from forming on the metal sheeting. It does it by making the temperature of the metal sheeting on the building approximately the same on the inside as the outside. When the heat or cold from outside comes through the metal skin it hits the outside aluminum facing of Prodex and is reflected back upwards through the underside of the metal sheeting. This process keeps the metal sheeting temperature consistent on both sides. In addition, the inside layer of aluminum in Prodex reflects away the heat (heater) or cold (air-conditioning) from inside the building, from getting to the metal skin. This also helps in preventing condensation. 
Spray foam insulation is becoming increasingly popular and replacing many traditional forms of insulation, such as fiberglass. When using a spray foam insulation, it is important to take the proper steps to ensure that it is flame resistant. While building code is frequently ambiguous, poorly worded, and poorly enforced, a builder should always take the proper safety precautions with spray foam insulation. Spray foam insulation typically needs either a thermal barrier or ignition barrier in order to satisfy building code requirements.

Building code regulations typically call for the use of thermal barriers when spray polyurethane foam is installed. The code requires that the foam is separated from any living spaces by a layer of 1/2-inch drywall. As discussed earlier, any material that has been approved as being as equally fire resistant as the gypsum drywall can be substituted as a thermal barrier. Spray Coating
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