Thermal barriers are defined in building code as 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard or any material that is as equally fire resistant as 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard. The gypsum wallboard is known as a prescriptive thermal barrier. Materials are tested in a 15-minute fire test in order to determine whether or not they are equal in fire resistance to the 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard. If they are, then they can be used and counted as the equivalent of gypsum wallboard.

Health monitoring: In order to avoid development of illnesses associated with exposure to isocyanates, health authorities recommend that people who use spray paint products that contain the substance provide a urine sample after a work shift at least once a year, with high frequencies in first few months on the job. A urine sample with ascertain levels of exposure, not the presence of disease associated with harmful chemicals.
The problem you saw with the closed cell foam pulling away like that is due to the heat of the foam was to hot. It was actually curing out and making foam before it could adhere to the wood. The installer wasn't reading his foam correctly. He should of stopped and turned down the heat on his hose temp. Also installers have to be aware that as the sun rises and the temp in attics rises the subtrates get hotter as well. This will cause the installer to adjust his heat when installing the foam as the temp changes thru out the day.  
Yes, absolutely. If you put spray foam insulation in a building, it needs a thermal barrier. That's what separates it from the occupied spaces. If there's a fire in the building, a thermal barrier keeps the combustible spray foam from the flames to increase fire resistance. The International Residential Code (IRC) and Internation Building Code (IBC) both include requirements for thermal barriers (and ignition barriers, too; see below). Coating Services
By heating the full-bodied paint to 60-80 °C, it is possible to apply a thicker coat. Originally the paint was recirculated, but as this caused bodying up, the system was changed to direct heating on line. Hot spraying was also used with Airless and Electrostatic Airless to decrease bounce-back. Two pack materials usually had premix before tip systems using dual pumps. Spray Coating
Thermal barriers are defined in building code as 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard or any material that is as equally fire resistant as 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard. The gypsum wallboard is known as a prescriptive thermal barrier. Materials are tested in a 15-minute fire test in order to determine whether or not they are equal in fire resistance to the 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard. If they are, then they can be used and counted as the equivalent of gypsum wallboard.
I have been looking to have closed cell insulation added through out my attic space. I cant seam to find a installed that wants to install no more than 2 inches, and thats not near my R-valve for South Carolina (Lake Greenwood)please send any advice that will help me to see what installer will perform the correct job. This is a expense that i can only afford to do once. Sandi
The long answer is more complicated. There are instances where ignition and thermal barriers are required, and others where they are not. It is all dependent on the location of the insulation. Additionally, the materials that satisfy the requirements of ignition and thermal barriers vary. In some circumstances, such as the use of an intumescent coating, an ignition or thermal barrier may not be necessary. It is important to check with your local code inspector to make sure that your use of spray foaminsulation and ignition barriers is correct.
Thermal spraying can provide thick coatings (approx. thickness range is 20 microns to several mm, depending on the process and feedstock), over a large area at high deposition rate as compared to other coating processes such as electroplating, physical and chemical vapor deposition. Coating materials available for thermal spraying include metals, alloys, ceramics, plastics and composites. They are fed in powder or wire form, heated to a molten or semimolten state and accelerated towards substrates in the form of micrometer-size particles. Combustion or electrical arc discharge is usually used as the source of energy for thermal spraying. Resulting coatings are made by the accumulation of numerous sprayed particles. The surface may not heat up significantly, allowing the coating of flammable substances.

Estimated Coverage: Standard product coverage on a smooth surface for Ames® Super Primer™ is 200 sq. ft. per gallon per coat and the product coverage rate for Ames® Maximum Stretch® and Ames® Iron Coat® is 100 sq. ft. per gallon per coat. Rough or uneven surfaces may require additional product. More than one coat of Ames® Maximum Stretch® or Ames® Iron Coat® is recommended. More coats equal longer life.
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Synavax™ thermal insulation coatings help organizations improve energy efficiency. They are nano-engineered patented cutting-edge thermal paint coatings that provide next generation performance beyond older, non-patented ceramic insulation products.  Additionally, our products are eco-friendly and provide mold-resistant and anti-condensation properties without harmful biocides and other harsh chemicals, which is a significant plus for sustainably-minded companies. Spray Coating
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