OK, Peter, I finally went back and read Alex Wilson's article on what he perceives as a serious problem. I haven't seen the full report, but based on the summary he wrote on the Green Building Advisor website, I question the science. It seems to me that he's chosen the wrong metric and he's basing his conclusion on too many assumptions because he doesn't have enough data. You can see my comments at the end of his article. Coating Services
The atomization of molten materials produces a large amount of dust and fumes made up of very fine particles (ca. 80–95% of the particles by number <100 nm).[8] Proper extraction facilities are vital, not only for personal safety, but to minimize entrapment of re-frozen particles in the sprayed coatings. The use of respirators, fitted with suitable filters, is strongly recommended, where equipment cannot be isolated.[8] Certain materials offer specific known hazards:[6]
The fluid pressure is provided by an airless pump, which allows much heavier materials to be sprayed than is possible with an airspray gun. Compressed air is introduced into the spray via an air nozzle (sometimes called air cap) similar to a standard conventional spray gun. The addition of compressed air improves the fineness of atomization. Additionally unlike a pure airless spray gun, an AA gun has some control over fan spray to round spray. Some electric airless sprayers (Wagner and Graco) are fitted with a compressor to allow the use of an air-assisted airless gun in situations where portability is important. Spray Coating Services
E/M Coating Services applies other coatings that provide performance-enhancing benefits such as corrosion protection, wear resistance, electrical insulation, electromagnetic shielding and chemical agent resistance. These coatings can be powder or liquid coatings such as PTFE, Xylan®, Epoxy, Polyester or Urethane. E/M Coating Services facilities have numerous OEM approvals for the application of coatings to aerospace, automotive and other industrial components in addition to FAA, Nadcap and ISO 9001/9002 approvals that might be required at individual facilities. E/M Coating Services can assist you in selecting the right coating to meet your design challenge, lower the cost of ownership or enhance the performance and longevity of your products. Selection of the proper coating can facilitate the use of less expensive metals, improve part wear life and reduce maintenance costs.
Mass-produced material is loaded on a conveyor belt where it is fed into one of these flatline machines. Flatline machines are designed to specifically paint material that is less than 4 inches (10 cm) thick and complex in shape, for example a kitchen cabinet door or drawer front. Spray guns are aligned above the material and the guns are in motion in order to hit all the grooves of the material. The guns can be moved in a cycle, circle, or can be moved back and forth in order to apply paint evenly across the material. Flatline systems are typically large and can paint doors, kitchen cabinets, and other plastic or wooden products. Coating Services
Hydraulic or air powered airless provide a more uniform pressure control since the paint piston moves at a constant speed except when it changes direction. In most direct drive piston pumps, the piston is crankshaft driven in which the piston will be constantly changing speed. The linear motors of hydraulic or compressed air drive pumps, are more efficient in converting engine power to material power, than crankshaft driven units. All types of paint can be painted by using airless method.
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In order to fulfill the requirements for an ignition barrier, most builders will choose to install a prescriptive ignition barrier such as mineral fiber insulation, install cellulose insulation, or install an approved alternate assembly of spray foam insulation coated with an intumescent coating. Recently, builders have begun using spray foam insulation that passes fire safety tests on their own, without any protective barriers or intumescent coatings.
Wire arc spray is a form of thermal spraying where two consumable metal wires are fed independently into the spray gun. These wires are then charged and an arc is generated between them. The heat from this arc melts the incoming wire, which is then entrained in an air jet from the gun. This entrained molten feedstock is then deposited onto a substrate with the help of compressed air. This process is commonly used for metallic, heavy coatings.[1]
We have a 1950's ranch in Atlanta and are interviewing foam contractors to spray open cell under the roof, with an "ankle wall" out towards the eaves to seal the attic. My wife and daughters are chemically sensitive, so I'm trying to figure out how to minimize the fumes coming into the house. Additionally, at least one contractor has offered (for > $900) to remove our existing rock wool & R-13 fibreglass from the attic floor to "increase cross-ventilation into the attic". Seems to me I can't both minimize fumes AND increase cross-ventilation. They also offered to spray a fire-retardant on for >$600. Would ventilation during installation help any or woud the retardant seal off the foam and help that way? Thanks...
Appropriate training for personnel who are responsible for conducting the painting procedures is important, which may be from a professional training provider or the product supplier. There are also hazards related to the disposal of wastes and materials that are contaminated with potentially harmful chemicals. Decontamination procedures and Material Safety Data Sheets for various products are important. Safety is improved through: Coating Services
A rule of thumb puts two thirds of the coating on the substrate and one third in the air. True HVLP guns use 8–20 cfm (13.6–34 m3/h), and an industrial compressor with a minimum of 5 horsepower (3.7 kW) output is required. HVLP spray systems are used in the automotive, decorative, marine, architectural coating, furniture finishing, scenic painting, and cosmetic industries. Spray Coating
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