Thermal barriers come in the form of 1/2-inch gypsum drywall or any material that is proven to have an equal fire resistance to gypsum wallboard. Additionally, alternate assemblies can be used if they have been tested in a laboratory and approved. Ignition barriers are a lower standard to meet, and can be satisfied with a number of different materials. Like thermal barriers, they can be substituted with equivalent fire resistant materials and alternate assemblies, such as an intumescent coating.
Blocking heat buildup is a complicated task. Heat comes in three forms: ultra-violet (UV), visible light, and infrared (IR). A quality ceramic coating will block all three, especially IR, which is responsible for roughly 57 percent of heat load on a building. “Some ceramic paints claim to block all heat caused by UV,” says Pritchett, “but UV only accounts for three percent of heat load on a building.” Spray Coating Services
This product has nice UV resistance, thus to reduce the temperature of your roof. It also resists cracking and withstands impact, providing a durable barrier for the roof.This product is non-polluting and non-toxic, being safe for the environment and your health. It’s easy to apply, and one gallon of this roof coating can cover up to 200 square feet of surface area. Spray Coating
With the increase in spray foaminsulation, many are wondering whether or not you should use a thermal or ignition barrier. Additionally, many are wondering if building codes require ignition or thermal barriers with spray foam insulation. The short answer is that you should use a thermal or ignition barrier, but the code may not necessarily require it. Building codes are often complicated, poorly written, poorly enforced, and up to interpretation by local code officials. This results in ambiguous requirements regarding spray foam insulation and fire protection. Spray Coating
E/M Coating Services applies other coatings that provide performance-enhancing benefits such as corrosion protection, wear resistance, electrical insulation, electromagnetic shielding and chemical agent resistance. These coatings can be powder or liquid coatings such as PTFE, Xylan®, Epoxy, Polyester or Urethane. E/M Coating Services facilities have numerous OEM approvals for the application of coatings to aerospace, automotive and other industrial components in addition to FAA, Nadcap and ISO 9001/9002 approvals that might be required at individual facilities. E/M Coating Services can assist you in selecting the right coating to meet your design challenge, lower the cost of ownership or enhance the performance and longevity of your products. Selection of the proper coating can facilitate the use of less expensive metals, improve part wear life and reduce maintenance costs.
Plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) is another form of wire arc spray which deposits a coating on the internal surface of a cylinder, or on the external surface of a part of any geometry. It is predominantly known for its use in coating the cylinder bores of an engine, enabling the use of Aluminum engine blocks without the need for heavy cast iron sleeves. A single conductive wire is used as "feedstock" for the system. A supersonic plasma jet melts the wire, atomizes it and propels it onto the substrate. The plasma jet is formed by a transferred arc between a non-consumable cathode and the type of a wire. After atomization, forced air transports the stream of molten droplets onto the bore wall. The particles flatten when they impinge on the surface of the substrate, due to the high kinetic energy. The particles rapidly solidify upon contact. The stacked particles make up a high wear resistant coating. The PTWA thermal spray process utilizes a single wire as the feedstock material. All conductive wires up to and including 0.0625" (1.6mm) can be used as feedstock material, including "cored" wires. PTWA can be used to apply a coating to the wear surface of engine or transmission components to replace a bushing or bearing. For example, using PTWA to coat the bearing surface of a connecting rod offers a number of benefits including reductions in weight, cost, friction potential, and stress in the connecting rod.
Heat Shield™ EPX-H2O is a complete thermal barrier insulation system for pipes, tanks, and other industrial equipment and can provide 100% insulation coverage of all odd-shaped configurations – no more expensive insulation jackets or insulated covers needed. This next generation heat insulating coating has you covered for all types of directives – energy savings, safe touch for employee safety, heat radiation reduction, and asset protection from chemicals and corrosion. Don’t leave uninsulated areas in your pipe and tank insulation system that will lead to heat and energy loss. Instead use an easy spray-on solution that can coat, protect, and insulate your entire heat process system, including valves, pipes, tanks, boilers, heat exchangers, and more. Synavax™ thermal insulating and protective coating is a technology you can trust to perform consistently for 10 years or more. Spray Coating

Steve: If your spray foam installer leaves the vents open, he will be committing the 2nd of the 4 problems I described above. You will most likely have comfort and efficiency problems. You may well have condensation problems. You will be spending a lot of money on a product that likely won't perform as it should. Don't let him leave the vents open. If the installer you've chosen doesn't understand this, you may want to choose someone else.  Spray Coating Services
Plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) is another form of wire arc spray which deposits a coating on the internal surface of a cylinder, or on the external surface of a part of any geometry. It is predominantly known for its use in coating the cylinder bores of an engine, enabling the use of Aluminum engine blocks without the need for heavy cast iron sleeves. A single conductive wire is used as "feedstock" for the system. A supersonic plasma jet melts the wire, atomizes it and propels it onto the substrate. The plasma jet is formed by a transferred arc between a non-consumable cathode and the type of a wire. After atomization, forced air transports the stream of molten droplets onto the bore wall. The particles flatten when they impinge on the surface of the substrate, due to the high kinetic energy. The particles rapidly solidify upon contact. The stacked particles make up a high wear resistant coating. The PTWA thermal spray process utilizes a single wire as the feedstock material. All conductive wires up to and including 0.0625" (1.6mm) can be used as feedstock material, including "cored" wires. PTWA can be used to apply a coating to the wear surface of engine or transmission components to replace a bushing or bearing. For example, using PTWA to coat the bearing surface of a connecting rod offers a number of benefits including reductions in weight, cost, friction potential, and stress in the connecting rod. Spray Coating
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The local foam installer that I used here in Hilton Head told me he looked for some peeling back of the foam. This was ensuring that it was at the perfect temperature which helped them maximize their yield (profit). I have open cell foam and it pulled away a little, and did so immediately (within minutes). They went back after they were done to any spots that pulled away too much and filled them with the touch up kit; they were looking for the top edge to roll just a little bit. 


The fluid pressure is provided by an airless pump, which allows much heavier materials to be sprayed than is possible with an airspray gun. Compressed air is introduced into the spray via an air nozzle (sometimes called air cap) similar to a standard conventional spray gun. The addition of compressed air improves the fineness of atomization. Additionally unlike a pure airless spray gun, an AA gun has some control over fan spray to round spray. Some electric airless sprayers (Wagner and Graco) are fitted with a compressor to allow the use of an air-assisted airless gun in situations where portability is important.
Condensation - It can seem like a tropical rain forest inside an unprotected metal building. It's worse on those days where there is a greater contrast between temperatures at night vs. day. The morning sun hitting the cool sheeting will create a drip. A temperature difference between outside and inside your building creates condensation - Similar to what happens when you leave a cold can of beer outside on a hot day. 
As this example illustrates, it's important to seal the envelope completely. One of spray foam's biggest selling points is its air-sealing ability, but it can't seal places where it's not sprayed. One of the nice things about using spray foam in new construction is that you can do a Blower Door test before the drywall goes in. Even better, you can test for leaks with a fog machine. Spray Coating
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