We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock.
FIRESHELL® (F10E) is a proprietary non-flammable, intumescing (expands up to 2000%) interior coating that provides oxygen starvation to fire. It is a non-toxic, water based, drain safe, no fuming GREEN product. FIRESHELL® passes full scale room corner over foam, NFPA 286 and E84 class A certified. Meets requirements for 15 minute thermal barrier. It is a water-based one part coating system that comes white but can be tinted different colors. This coating can be top-coated with either latex or oil based coating. Insulation Spray Coating
By heating the full-bodied paint to 60-80 °C, it is possible to apply a thicker coat. Originally the paint was recirculated, but as this caused bodying up, the system was changed to direct heating on line. Hot spraying was also used with Airless and Electrostatic Airless to decrease bounce-back. Two pack materials usually had premix before tip systems using dual pumps.
Thermal spraying need not be a dangerous process, if the equipment is treated with care, and correct spraying practices are followed. As with any industrial process, there are a number of hazards, of which the operator should be aware, and against which specific precautions should be taken. Ideally, equipment should be operated automatically, in enclosures specially designed to extract fumes, reduce noise levels, and prevent direct viewing of the spraying head. Such techniques will also produce coatings that are more consistent. There are occasions when the type of components being treated, or their low production levels, requires manual equipment operation. Under these conditions, a number of hazards, peculiar to thermal spraying, are experienced, in addition to those commonly encountered in production or processing industries.[6]
Car was washed with Carpro reset and wiped down with Griots garage paint prep to ensure a clean surface for first application of CMX. Week one CMX had a nice gloss with small tight beads after getting rained on (typical Si02 protection). Week two the beads were large and flat (low contact angle) so product was on it's way out. Week three the water was sheeting with no beading at all. That's complete failure in three weeks. Also I didn't like the white crystals that developed in the bottle. I'm concerned that if I used the product again that I'd mar my Audi's Mythos black paint. My car is parked outside driven only about 50 miles per week and is washed weekly with Megs gold class car wash. . Won't apply it again. Moving on....

You like to make the tough call and enjoy having the authority to make decisions in the best interests of your customers. At PPG Coatings Services, we value those traits because our industry is constantly changing. In our business, you can't always wait for a decision, a change or a result. We constantly invest in our business, but we also invest in you, providing the skills, technical knowledge and independence you need to create loyal, satisfied and successful customers.

For over a decade, Synavax™ has served as the preferred industrial thermal barrier insulation, energy saving, surface protection and asset protection coating, meeting the needs of multiple industries around the world, including pulp and paper manufacturing, food and beverage manufacturing, U.S. military, oil and gas, textile manufacturing and many others. Spray Coating
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