Formerly known as MetoKote, The Crown Group and Electra Finish (EFI), PPG’s coatings services applies coatings to customers’ manufactured parts and assembled products. It operates on-site coatings services within several customer manufacturing locations, as well as at regional service centers, located throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Germany, Hungary and the Czech Republic. Customers ship parts to PPG service centers, where they are treated to enhance paint adhesion and painted with electrocoat, powder or liquid coatings technologies. Coated parts are then shipped to the customer’s next stage of assembly. PPG coats an average of more than 1.5 million parts per day.

To say spray foam insulation has become popular in green building over the past decade is like saying Peyton Manning is a good quarterback. It's an understatement. Although it's certainly not used in every green building project, it's become one of the most popular ways to build an air-tight house. In the early days, building codes hadn't caught up with how best to use this material, but that's changing. Change begets confusion, though, and the requirements for thermal and ignition barriers are one area where there's a lot of that.
Warm spraying is a novel modification of high velocity oxy-fuel spraying, in which the temperature of combustion gas is lowered by mixing nitrogen with the combustion gas, thus bringing the process closer to the cold spraying. The resulting gas contains much water vapor, unreacted hydrocarbons and oxygen, and thus is dirtier than the cold spraying. However, the coating efficiency is higher. On the other hand, lower temperatures of warm spraying reduce melting and chemical reactions of the feed powder, as compared to HVOF. These advantages are especially important for such coating materials as Ti, plastics, and metallic glasses, which rapidly oxidize or deteriorate at high temperatures.[1] Spray Coating
During the 1980s, a class of thermal spray processes called high velocity oxy-fuel spraying was developed. A mixture of gaseous or liquid fuel and oxygen is fed into a combustion chamber, where they are ignited and combusted continuously. The resultant hot gas at a pressure close to 1 MPa emanates through a converging–diverging nozzle and travels through a straight section. The fuels can be gases (hydrogen, methane, propane, propylene, acetylene, natural gas, etc.) or liquids (kerosene, etc.). The jet velocity at the exit of the barrel (>1000 m/s) exceeds the speed of sound. A powder feed stock is injected into the gas stream, which accelerates the powder up to 800 m/s. The stream of hot gas and powder is directed towards the surface to be coated. The powder partially melts in the stream, and deposits upon the substrate. The resulting coating has low porosity and high bond strength.[1] Insulation Spray Coating
Proper storage: Since, paints and thinners are fire hazards, extra care must be taken not only while they are in use. Fire safety should also be considered when storing paint supplies.[10] In the United States, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provides guidelines for the proper storage of flammable materials.[11] Many products used in spray painting are flammable such that fire risk is likely within a distance of 15 cm from the nozzle. As such, ignition sources must be placed at a safe distance. In addition, there is a risk of dust explosions when finely-divided paint particles become airborne.
Building code regulations typically call for the use of thermal barriers when spray polyurethane foam is installed. The code requires that the foam is separated from any living spaces by a layer of 1/2-inch drywall. As discussed earlier, any material that has been approved as being as equally fire resistant as the gypsum drywall can be substituted as a thermal barrier. Spray Coating
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