Spraying paint with compressed air can be traced back to its use on the Southern Pacific Railway in the early 1880s[1] In 1887 Joseph Binks, the maintenance supervisor at Chicago's Marshall Field's Wholesale Store developed a hand pumped cold-water paint spraying machine to apply whitewash to the subbasement walls of the store.[2][3] Francis Davis Millet, the decorations director for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, used Binks and his spray painting system to apply whitewash consisting of a mix of oil and white lead to the buildings at the Exposition, taking considerably less time than traditional brush painting and tuning it into what has been called the White City.[4][1][3] In 1949, Edward Seymour developed a type of spray painting, aerosol paint, that could be delivered via a compressed aerosol in a can. Insulation Spray Coating
Yes, you're right that all of the problems mentioned above are related to the installer. I didn't try to hide that and even used the word 'installer' in two of the four headings. I can see how you'd think that the title is misleading, but in the end you can't separate spray foam insulation from its installation. Some people have the mistaken impression that if you get spray foam in your house, your home will outperform all others. My point here is that that's not true. Insulation Spray Coating
We highly recommend the Rubberseal as the best roof coating. It is waterproof and protective, while having less odor and volatile organic compounds. It would be perfect for those who do roof coating as a daily job.The Rubberseal is designed to provide a reliable seal for all types of waterproofing applications. It’s ideal for both home and industry uses.
I am building a house in Central Texas (Caldwell). Several builders are cautious about using foam insulation and/or a closed attic. I would like to use both. Here in Texas, heat and humidity (except for the past few years of drought) are a continuing problem. Which type of foam would be the best to use in our home, where should the vapor barrier be or should be use one at all, if we are using fans in the exterior walls to supply fresh air to the house, do we need a vented attic or will it cause more problems than it solve? I have printed out your article and the blogs to give to my contractors and architect, but I would really appreciate your comments on the products being used in my part of the US. 
Wire arc spray is a form of thermal spraying where two consumable metal wires are fed independently into the spray gun. These wires are then charged and an arc is generated between them. The heat from this arc melts the incoming wire, which is then entrained in an air jet from the gun. This entrained molten feedstock is then deposited onto a substrate with the help of compressed air. This process is commonly used for metallic, heavy coatings.[1] Spray Coating Services
Legend Coatings & Insulation, LLC has set the foundation for all insulating and coating applications. With over 12 years experience in the field we have established the dynamics uniquely behind each of our systems. Our dual proportional coatings rig allows us mobilization with the capacity to be self sufficient and finishing your project on time and on budget. Coating Services
This is where things get a little tricky. If a home has spray foam insulation in an attic or crawl space, the building code requires using materials or assemblies that offer some fire resistance but not as much as is required for a thermal barrier. If you've got spray foam insulation in an attic, for example, it's probably already separated from the living space by a thermal barrier. Most ceilings are made of 1/2" drywall. But the spray foam is still exposed to the attic and needs an ignition barrier.

Yes, absolutely. If you put spray foam insulation in a building, it needs a thermal barrier. That's what separates it from the occupied spaces. If there's a fire in the building, a thermal barrier keeps the combustible spray foam from the flames to increase fire resistance. The International Residential Code (IRC) and Internation Building Code (IBC) both include requirements for thermal barriers (and ignition barriers, too; see below). Coating Services
If you're chemically sensitive, it's probably not a good idea to get it installed, but it's also not a good idea to breathe musty air from the crawl space either. In addition, your house and its contents are made of lots of materials that affect your indoor air quality. If you're really concerned about this, hire a company to test your air and tell you what you can do about it.

The Barrier product family is EPS foam under The Barrier product family is EPS foam under slab insulation and vapor retarder in a roll designed to insulate radiant heating projects from heat loss and retard moisture migration through concrete. The core of the product is made of flexible recyclable expanded polystyrene that provides excellent insulation characteristics that are ...  More + Product Details Close Coating Services

That’s $58.3 Billion dollars. That’s roughly how much money we wasted in 2010 in the US according to the Department of Energy because of air leaking out of our building envelopes. If your building leaks energy, you’re paying more for energy than you need to. Clearly you’re not alone. If you’re ready to claim your share of the savings, it’s quicker and easier than you think.
When you want to take any metal surface and make it more visually appealing, pay a visit to Xtreme Power Coating in Grand Prairie TX. Since 2003 we have provided powder coating services in Grand Prairie, TX that bring our customers’ furniture, iron fences and decorative metal pieces to life. Powder coat finishing transforms dull, worn out metal and gives it a bold, beautiful sheen that passersby won’t be able to help but notice. Prepare for compliments once your metal décor receives a powder coat finish make over. When it comes to powder coating in Grand Prairie, TX, no one else comes close to Xtreme Powder Coating. Insulation Spray Coating

Like HVLP, low volume low pressure (LVLP) spray guns also operate at a lower pressure (LP), but they use a low volume (LV) of air when compared to conventional and HVLP equipment. This is a further effort at increasing the transfer efficiency (amount of coating that ends up on the target surface) of spray guns, while decreasing the amount of compressed air consumption.


Building code regulations typically call for the use of thermal barriers when spray polyurethane foam is installed. The code requires that the foam is separated from any living spaces by a layer of 1/2-inch drywall. As discussed earlier, any material that has been approved as being as equally fire resistant as the gypsum drywall can be substituted as a thermal barrier. Spray Coating
×