If your foam pulled away just a little bit, Jamie, and they were able to fix it with just a little bit of touching up, then it wasn't as bad as the house where I saw this problem. As the last photo above shows, it had pulled away significantly from the studs and rafters, and it was all over the house. This was closed cell foam, and interestingly, it didn't pull away from the horizontal framing members, just the vertical and sloped ones. They did some touch up, but that wasn't enough. I don't know how this one ended up getting resolved. I think maybe the contractor came back and sprayed cellulose on top of the foam.
Weather & Drying Guidelines: Ames® Super Primer™, Maximum-Stretch® and Iron Coat® is best applied between 50° to 90° F (10° to 32° C) on warm dry surfaces. Apply when the streets are dry, the sun is in the sky and no inclement weather is forecast. Starts to dry in about 2-8 hours, depending on thickness of application and weather. It is recommended to allow a minimum of 24 hours between coats with no rain in the forecast and no freezing temperatures. Low temperatures, high humidity and evening and morning dew will require increased drying/curing time. Do not apply after 2pm for best drying. The earlier you can put it on, the better. Make sure any morning dew is completely dried off before proceeding. Spray Coating

New fire safety tests for intumescent coatings were created by code officials and the spray foam industry, and many manufacturers found their closed cell spray foams could pass the test without any intumescent coating. Some open cell spray foam can pass the fire tests without an intumescent coating, but most still require the coating. Approved closed cell spray foams do not need the ignition barriers discussed above, which can make the job easier for builders. Insulation Spray Coating
OK, Peter, I finally went back and read Alex Wilson's article on what he perceives as a serious problem. I haven't seen the full report, but based on the summary he wrote on the Green Building Advisor website, I question the science. It seems to me that he's chosen the wrong metric and he's basing his conclusion on too many assumptions because he doesn't have enough data. You can see my comments at the end of his article. Spray Coating Services
The problem was that the installer was doing his first spray foam job ever, and the thickness of the insulation varied from zero (visible roof deck) to about 9". Unfortunately, good average thickness doesn't cut it. The coverage needs to be uniform because a lot of heat will go through the under-insulated areas. (See my article on flat or lumpy insulation performance.) Insulation Spray Coating
Spray foam comes in two flavors, open cell and closed cell, and provides both parts of the building envelope - the insulation and the air barrier. The building envelope should completely surround the conditioned space, and the insulation needs to be in contact with the air barrier. Since spray foam is both insulation and air barrier, proper alignment of insulation and air barrier is guaranteed.
Plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) is another form of wire arc spray which deposits a coating on the internal surface of a cylinder, or on the external surface of a part of any geometry. It is predominantly known for its use in coating the cylinder bores of an engine, enabling the use of Aluminum engine blocks without the need for heavy cast iron sleeves. A single conductive wire is used as "feedstock" for the system. A supersonic plasma jet melts the wire, atomizes it and propels it onto the substrate. The plasma jet is formed by a transferred arc between a non-consumable cathode and the type of a wire. After atomization, forced air transports the stream of molten droplets onto the bore wall. The particles flatten when they impinge on the surface of the substrate, due to the high kinetic energy. The particles rapidly solidify upon contact. The stacked particles make up a high wear resistant coating. The PTWA thermal spray process utilizes a single wire as the feedstock material. All conductive wires up to and including 0.0625" (1.6mm) can be used as feedstock material, including "cored" wires. PTWA can be used to apply a coating to the wear surface of engine or transmission components to replace a bushing or bearing. For example, using PTWA to coat the bearing surface of a connecting rod offers a number of benefits including reductions in weight, cost, friction potential, and stress in the connecting rod.
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When do you need an ignition barrier? According to the IRC and IBC, an attic or crawl space needs an ignition barrier over the spray foam if the space can be accessed but will not be used for storage or auxiliary living space. You don't need an ignition barrier if the space cannot be accessed without cutting into it, if it is not connected to other spaces, and if it does not communicate with other spaces.


When using this roof coating, two coats are required. It doesn’t take much time to apply the coating. If the weather is not humid, the coating will take only a few hours to get completely dry in full sun.This coating can go over and hold strong on the sealing tapes. This feature helps you to restore your roof to brand new. It may save thousands of dollars from replacing your old roof. Spray Coating
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