Closed-cell (aka two-pound foam) is denser than open-cell at about 2 pounds per cubic foot. Its R-Value is between 6-6.5 per inch. As a result, this kind of foam is much more expensive than its counterpart. The reason closed-cell doesn't need a vapor retarder is because it already has one. It's permeance is 0.8 perm, which means it can handle cold climates without the use of an additional board or drywall. Closed-cell uses hydroflurocarbons (HFCs) as part of its makeup. However, this material has been known to have a high global warming effect. If you want a green insulation solution, this is not the material to use. A way to avoid this and still use closed-cell is by installing it alongside fiberglass batts. Spray Coating Services
The second type of barrier that prevents insulation from catching fire is called the ignition barrier. Ignition barriers are a lower standard to meet than a thermal barrier. Additionally, several different materials can meet the definition of an ignition barrier. Now that we have established the code jargon for spray foam barriers, we can look at each type in detail.

Whether you work on frame-up restorations in your garage, or projects like refinishing wheels, interior upgrades or maintaining the appearance of your everyday ride, Dupli-Color wants to be there with you. We have a heritage of providing only the best in automotive products since 1938, when we first started selling touch-up paint. This marked the beginning of “innovative firsts” which continues today with the automotive aftermarket’s largest array of DIY paints, primers and coatings. Spray Coating Services
When intumescent coatings are used with spray foaminsulation, they are specific to each insulation brand. You cannot use one intumescent coating with a brand that it was not intended for. If you do not use the properspray foaminsulation brand and intumescent coating combination, then your work will not technically be up to code. Additionally, it is important to keep in mind that intumescent coating can only be used as an ignition barrier alternative if it is being used in an attic or crawl space. And, even then, it can only be used if space is not used for storage and is accessible through a small hatch or door.
The Rubberseal creates a coat that can efficiently reflect heat off the roofs of buildings. It is Energy Star rated, which means it’s friendly to the environment.The spread rate of this product is 60 square feet per gallon at 20 imperial mils. It dries in 2 hours but takes 72 hours to get fully cured. Check the weather forecast before you apply it. Spray Coating Services
These are robust production capabilities, which allow us to consistently and reliably meet a broad range of coating requirements. Our technical managers ensure the substrate and coating are compatible and are the best possible materials for the job. We engineer our process to deliver a uniform coating in a precise layer from .001” to .005” in thickness. Spray Coating

Thermal barriers are defined in building code as 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard or any material that is as equally fire resistant as 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard. The gypsum wallboard is known as a prescriptive thermal barrier. Materials are tested in a 15-minute fire test in order to determine whether or not they are equal in fire resistance to the 1/2-inch gypsum wallboard. If they are, then they can be used and counted as the equivalent of gypsum wallboard. Coating Services


HVOF coatings may be as thick as 12 mm (1/2"). It is typically used to deposit wear and corrosion resistant coatings on materials, such as ceramic and metallic layers. Common powders include WC-Co, chromium carbide, MCrAlY, and alumina. The process has been most successful for depositing cermet materials (WC–Co, etc.) and other corrosion-resistant alloys (stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, aluminium, hydroxyapatite for medical implants, etc.).[1]
Mass-produced material is loaded on a conveyor belt where it is fed into one of these flatline machines. Flatline machines are designed to specifically paint material that is less than 4 inches (10 cm) thick and complex in shape, for example a kitchen cabinet door or drawer front. Spray guns are aligned above the material and the guns are in motion in order to hit all the grooves of the material. The guns can be moved in a cycle, circle, or can be moved back and forth in order to apply paint evenly across the material. Flatline systems are typically large and can paint doors, kitchen cabinets, and other plastic or wooden products.
Schweitzer Spray Coatings is a family owned and operated business, located in West Bend WI. Our company serves a wide variety of roof coatings to Agriculture/Farms, Commercial/Industrial and Residential Accounts. We specialize in coating buildings, pole sheds, barns, and trailers. If you are experiencing any leaks, rust, or just need a new paint coating, contact us today for your rubber roof solution.
Spray painting poses health hazards that affect the respiratory, nervous, and circulatory systems. Similarly, using solvents to clean one's hands of paint marks and residue may cause skin irritation or even more serious issues since many are carcinogenic or neurotoxic. There are risks involved in working with substances such as paint and thinner, which contain compounds that are potentially harmful to health, or even fatal.[9] Insulation Spray Coating
Thank you, Allison. We have a split system unit (actually 5) with the heat being propane. The foam guy said that it needed ventilation, so completely sealing the attic wouldn't be a good idea. It sounds like you are saying that the systems need to be vented out of the attic or replaced with some type of closed system. But I shouldn't bother spraying if the plan is to leave the soffet vents open. Is that correct?
In plasma spraying process, the material to be deposited (feedstock) — typically as a powder, sometimes as a liquid,[2] suspension [3] or wire — is introduced into the plasma jet, emanating from a plasma torch. In the jet, where the temperature is on the order of 10,000 K, the material is melted and propelled towards a substrate. There, the molten droplets flatten, rapidly solidify and form a deposit. Commonly, the deposits remain adherent to the substrate as coatings; free-standing parts can also be produced by removing the substrate. There are a large number of technological parameters that influence the interaction of the particles with the plasma jet and the substrate and therefore the deposit properties. These parameters include feedstock type, plasma gas composition and flow rate, energy input, torch offset distance, substrate cooling, etc.

I ordered a 5 gallon pail of WHITE  silicone roofing to use on my 3 season porch roof. I pressure washed and scrubbed the existing roof clean. When the product came it was not white as shown on the invoice, it was tan. After all of the time I spent cleaning and being that i travel for work, i did not have time to send it back and get the WHITE I had ordered. I applied two full coats of the tan and it went on well and looks good. Other that the color I am satisfied so far. I will likely not purchase from  Roof Coating Supply company again as they did not even respond to my complaint about the color. Spray Coating
Spraying paint with compressed air can be traced back to its use on the Southern Pacific Railway in the early 1880s[1] In 1887 Joseph Binks, the maintenance supervisor at Chicago's Marshall Field's Wholesale Store developed a hand pumped cold-water paint spraying machine to apply whitewash to the subbasement walls of the store.[2][3] Francis Davis Millet, the decorations director for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, used Binks and his spray painting system to apply whitewash consisting of a mix of oil and white lead to the buildings at the Exposition, taking considerably less time than traditional brush painting and tuning it into what has been called the White City.[4][1][3] In 1949, Edward Seymour developed a type of spray painting, aerosol paint, that could be delivered via a compressed aerosol in a can. Spray Coating
Open-cell is also known as half-pound foam. It has an R-Value of 3.5-3.6 per inch, and its density is bout 0.5 pounds per cubic food. Low-density foams like these are made partially from raw biological materials Carbon dioxide or water is also used in the makeup. Open-cell uses far less material than closed-cell, but its R-Value is lower. Also, open cell requires a vapor retarder (like gypsum wallboard) and is riskier when used for roof sheathing. It's not highly recommended that you use open-cell insulation if you live in a cold climate unless you have that extra barrier. You should also compare how much money you spend versus how effective the open-cell insulation is wherever it's installed.
Sean, thanks for jumping in and answering John's questions. About choosing the right foam, I intentionally avoided the open cell vs. closed cell foam debate. I did this partly because it's worthy of an article all by itself, but mainly I didn't include it because, despite all the warnings the two sides issue about the other, I've never personally seen a problem caused by using open cell where they should've used closed cell or vice versa. I'm sure things like that happen; I just haven't seen it yet.
If you're plagued with quality problems caused by uneven application of coatings or waste of costly coatings due to over-application, take a close look at our products for precision coating. You will find a wide range of nozzles, standard and heated spray headers and automated spray systems to apply all types of coatings – including thick slurries, chocolate, viscous oils and more – uniformly with minimal waste.
OK, Peter, I finally went back and read Alex Wilson's article on what he perceives as a serious problem. I haven't seen the full report, but based on the summary he wrote on the Green Building Advisor website, I question the science. It seems to me that he's chosen the wrong metric and he's basing his conclusion on too many assumptions because he doesn't have enough data. You can see my comments at the end of his article.

HVOF coatings may be as thick as 12 mm (1/2"). It is typically used to deposit wear and corrosion resistant coatings on materials, such as ceramic and metallic layers. Common powders include WC-Co, chromium carbide, MCrAlY, and alumina. The process has been most successful for depositing cermet materials (WC–Co, etc.) and other corrosion-resistant alloys (stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, aluminium, hydroxyapatite for medical implants, etc.).[1]


Jennifer, I'm not an expert on the health effects of closed cell foam. A lot of people live in houses with closed cell foam and have no health problems from it, at least not short-term, acute problems. I do know of one person who had it removed from her crawl space because she was convinced it caused her dog to get sick, but I know only what she told me.  
Warm spraying is a novel modification of high velocity oxy-fuel spraying, in which the temperature of combustion gas is lowered by mixing nitrogen with the combustion gas, thus bringing the process closer to the cold spraying. The resulting gas contains much water vapor, unreacted hydrocarbons and oxygen, and thus is dirtier than the cold spraying. However, the coating efficiency is higher. On the other hand, lower temperatures of warm spraying reduce melting and chemical reactions of the feed powder, as compared to HVOF. These advantages are especially important for such coating materials as Ti, plastics, and metallic glasses, which rapidly oxidize or deteriorate at high temperatures.[1]
When you want to take any metal surface and make it more visually appealing, pay a visit to Xtreme Power Coating in Grand Prairie TX. Since 2003 we have provided powder coating services in Grand Prairie, TX that bring our customers’ furniture, iron fences and decorative metal pieces to life. Powder coat finishing transforms dull, worn out metal and gives it a bold, beautiful sheen that passersby won’t be able to help but notice. Prepare for compliments once your metal décor receives a powder coat finish make over. When it comes to powder coating in Grand Prairie, TX, no one else comes close to Xtreme Powder Coating. Spray Coating
During the 1980s, a class of thermal spray processes called high velocity oxy-fuel spraying was developed. A mixture of gaseous or liquid fuel and oxygen is fed into a combustion chamber, where they are ignited and combusted continuously. The resultant hot gas at a pressure close to 1 MPa emanates through a converging–diverging nozzle and travels through a straight section. The fuels can be gases (hydrogen, methane, propane, propylene, acetylene, natural gas, etc.) or liquids (kerosene, etc.). The jet velocity at the exit of the barrel (>1000 m/s) exceeds the speed of sound. A powder feed stock is injected into the gas stream, which accelerates the powder up to 800 m/s. The stream of hot gas and powder is directed towards the surface to be coated. The powder partially melts in the stream, and deposits upon the substrate. The resulting coating has low porosity and high bond strength.[1] Spray Coating
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